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Glossary from "Counselling for Alcohol Problems" from PREMIUM Counselling Treatments, Vikram Patel.



Browse the glossary using this index

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A

Action Plan

The Action Plan is the set of actions that the patient and the counsellor have agreed will be done in between one session and another. The Action Plan relates to the overall plan and to the Target Behaviour(s) discussed in the session, but it is an account of some more detailed steps that the patient will be taking in between one session and another

Affirming

Using praise

Ambivalence

By ambivalence we mean ‘having strong feelings in opposing directions’. For example, a patient with harmful drinking may realise that his drinking has started creating problems in his life and he should change; and at the same time he may also have a strong desire to continue drinking. Helping a patient to resolve such opposing feelings is a very important step in developing his ‘motivation to change’.

Ambivalent feeling about change

AUD

Acronym for Alcohol Use Disorders (AUD)

C

CAP

Acronym for Counselling for Alcohol Problems

Change Plan

The change plan is the overall plan outlining

  • What the changes are that the patient wants to achieve in counselling (e.g. to completely stop drinking) , outlining
  • What his main reasons are for wanting to change • What steps he wants to take to achieve this change
  • Who can help him achieve this, and how
  • How he will know if the plan is working
  • What could interfere with the plan
  • How these things could be dealt with

Change Talk

A patient’s statements which show that they are in favour of change are termed ‘change talk’. It helps patients to change their behaviour if they hear themselves stating that they want to do this. If we can encourage the patient to make ‘change statements’ or to generate ‘change talk’, it is more likely that they will go on to change.

Coping skills

Coping Skills are skills that our patients use to deal with (or cope with) challenging situations. These situations could include having an urge to drink, or feeling some negative emotion, or being pressurised to drink alcohol when it is not wanted.

Counselling Relationship Manual

General Counselling Skils in attached manual. 

D

Depression

Persistent sadness and loss of interest with reduced sleep/appetite, guilt feelings, feelings of hopelessness, etc.

Drinking Diary

A single sheet of paper in the form of a diary, on which a patient monitors his drinking over a specific period (usually a week, sometimes longer), in a systematic fashion, collecting information about precisely how much is consumed, when, where, and with whom.

H

Hallucinations

Hearing voices or seeing visions even when one is alone.

Homework

Part of the Action Plan, Homework Tasks are specific tasks that we agree with the patient (and his SO) that he will undertake in between sessions, and tell us about during his next session, such as ‘fill out the drinking diary’, or ‘go to the college and get information about the course that we have discussed’, etc.

L

Lapse

Part of the Action Plan, Homework Tasks are specific tasks that we agree with the patient (and his SO) that he will undertake in between sessions, and tell us about during his next session, such as ‘fill out the drinking diary’, or ‘go to the college and get information about the course that we have discussed’, etc.

M

Motivation to change

The strength of an individual’s motivation for and movement towards a specific goal (in this case, changing their drinking behaviour.

P

Personalised feedback

We let a patient know how and why his drinking may be harmful, and how it may be related to any problems or issues that he may have told us about, during the assessment.

R

Relapse

When a patient has a lapse, if he stops drinking, or drinking uncontrollably, quite speedily, then the lapse remains as a lapse. But if he continues drinking in this way, then his lapse turns into a relapse. Relapse is not just an event of drinking alcohol again but is a process which starts with thoughts about drinking alcohol, goes on to actual drinking, and then continues so that the patient is drinking at increasing quantity and frequency.

S

Sustain Talk

A patient’s statements which argue against any change in drinking behaviour are called ‘sustain talk’. The more that patients hear themselves saying that they don’t want to change, the less likely it is that they will change.

T

Target Behaviour

The Target Behaviour is the thing (or set of things) that we are working on during a counselling session. As in the examples in the text, “Typically, these include targets related to drinking (e.g. not drinking at all over the past week, or drinking on only some days and to a pre-agreed level) and those related to other things (e.g. not seeing friends who put pressure on the patient to drink; or dealing with conflict at work or at home in a different way, which does not involve drinking)”

W

Withdrawal Symptoms

These occur in the most severe form of drinking, called Dependent Drinking. People’s bodies have become used to receiving alcohol regularly, and if they do not get it, their body reacts giving very unpleasant (and in extreme cases dangerous) effects, including sweating, nausea, and in serious cases uncontrollable shaking, vomiting, or fits.